Fairchild Tropical Garden Expedition aboard the Cheng Ho 1939-1940
NOVEMBER 1939
 
 
 
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DECEMBER 1939
 
 
 
 
 
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JANUARY 1940
 
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FEBRUARY 1940
 
 
 
 
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DEC 1939
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Manila

Written by Edward Beckwith on Saturday, December 30, 1939

Cheng Ho in Manila Harbor

Cheng Ho in Manila Harbor, photographed by Edward Beckwith
Cheng Ho in Manila Harbor with Manila Hotel in the background

Cheng Ho in Manila Harbor with Manila Hotel in the background, photographed by Edward Beckwith
Deck of the Cheng Ho after arrival in Manila

Deck of the Cheng Ho after arrival in Manila, photographed by Edward Beckwith. Captain Ted Kilkenny is in the center.
Sent postals to Mrs. C., Bob Finlay, Nicol Smith, Anne Chouti, and Dan Comstock.

Hugo telephoned me he had a new flower to photograph so he came in and I took a closeup. David also came in.

Marian, David and I were at lunch talking about early days of aviation when Marian said “there comes something that looks like a junk”. It was far out, no sails up and the masts looked like tripods. Of course I said “impossible she could get here so quickly”. But the craft looked all the queerer as she approached and I ran upstairs to get the binoculars. I saw her just as she came from behind a steamer. It was the junk. Then the excitement began, telephoning to the quarantine station and the George Fairchilds. We finally got a boat to take us out to where she was anchored. Marian and I at first agreed not to go aboard until Mrs. Archbold arrived so she could show it to us. David and Hugo said we were silly. But when we got out there and I saw Kilkenny on deck there was nothing to do but go on board, so I said to Marian “we had good intentions anyway.” Hubrecht was there, Fenton Kilkenny, who I had not met, Capt. Fant, who has been with them several months and is capt. of a coastwise steamer, Petersen, an Australian Torrie, a heavy young fellow who wants to go along, and a crew of 10 Chinese, all brothers or cousins so that they will get along well.

We found they had left on Tuesday instead of Wednesday as Mrs. A. had cabled and they were therefore just about 4 days making the 750 miles. A rough trip with the junk across the seas. Everyone was somewhat sea sick. They used the engines a good deal and made about 8 knots. Capt. Fant did the navigating.

The interior of the junk was roomy and luxurious, all in beautiful woodwork. I can show it best by photographs which I will take.

The Fairchilds gave the largest dinner party at the hotel of any I have seen since my arrival. I sat between Dr. and Mrs. Smith. The party was predominantly men. Most of the guests left fairly early and I then sat in the dining room and talked with Kilkenny and Fant, Petersen, Torrey, and the hotel entertainer, Dave Harvey, was also there. Kilkenny told me confidentially that he had had a hard time working for Mrs. Archbold who was very exacting. I left them at about 11.

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