Fairchild Tropical Garden Expedition aboard the Cheng Ho 1939-1940
NOVEMBER 1939
 
 
 
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DECEMBER 1939
 
 
 
 
 
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JANUARY 1940
 
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FEBRUARY 1940
 
 
 
 
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JAN 1940
5

Manila

Written by Edward Beckwith on Friday, January 5, 1940

Courtship house in Bontoc village

Courtship house in Bontoc village, photographed by Edward Beckwith
Coffin outside a hut in Bontoc village

Coffin outside a hut in Bontoc village, photographed by Edward Beckwith
Marian told me yesterday about a Mrs. Robertson at the hotel who travels with her husband and has a plan which has been successful. She gets someone in the U.S. whom she knows well to put up $150 and she puts up $150. On this capital she buys things here and in other countries and ships them to her friend for sale. They make no distributions of profits until the original $300 has been realized. Her plan goes under the name of “the Treasure Chest.”

Mr. Chapman, an insurance man, gave me the apparently true version of the Bontoc customs. The Oolog is the courting house for girls, the Annog for boys. The narrow door on the girls house is so they can keep out any man who is not favoured. When a girl gets pregnant the boy is expected to marry her. As many as 12 girls are in the house at once. The stone on which women are not allowed to sit is a bad luck superstition. The reason living persons have coffins is that it takes a long time to make them. The dead are placed in the special house and a fire built under them until they are cooked.

Did not sleep well last night but had a good rest which is a fair equivalent.

A Mr. Roy Scott wrote me a note inviting me to see some of his color photos. Saw him in his room at the hotel and found he was with Walt Disney. He showed and told me some interesting things. He advised sending Kodachrome to Emery Huse, Eastman Kodak Co., Santa Monica Boulevard, Hollywood, California.

Went to the boat at 11 and cleared up the darkroom, placing all the Kodachrome film in the refrigerator. Marian sent me a present of sandals, just what I wanted.

Saw Kilkenny and found he had been working on his accounts and had them finished for today at Mrs. A’s insistence. When they were done she said she would look at them tomorrow. We all had lunch at the hotel. Mrs. A. was nervous and energetic and made a big row about the service, which was pretty poor. Am invited to dinner tonight and lunch party tomorrow. Mrs. A. vetoed any sending radio when I brought up the subject at David’s suggestion.

Had a good sleep in the afternoon in preparation for the evening.

We are planning to leave on Sunday after a twenty four hour fumigation with HCN for cockroaches, etc. tomorrow.

Ann, David, Marian and I went to a dinner of older people at the Nobles, one of the Standard Oil group. The house and furnishings were beautiful but the evening was uninteresting. I sat on Mrs. Nobles left and rather enjoyed talking to her on conventional subjects. She said the Philippine men were interesting and friendly but the women were difficult to get anything out of. We came home at 11.

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