Fairchild Tropical Garden Expedition aboard the Cheng Ho 1939-1940
NOVEMBER 1939
 
 
 
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DECEMBER 1939
 
 
 
 
 
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JANUARY 1940
 
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FEBRUARY 1940
 
 
 
 
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JAN 1940
6

Manila

Written by Edward Beckwith on Saturday, January 6, 1940

Malacanang Presidential Palace

Malacanang Presidential Palace, Manila, Philippines, photographed in 2007
Malacanang Presidential Palace

Malacanang Presidential Palace, Manila, Philippines, photographed in 2008 by Taralets!
Anne called me at 8 and came to my room to see if she could use my trunks. She decided to use one, so I went to her room and helped her pack. David came in. I had the trunk closed and locked several times when she always found more things to put in it. This took so much time that I did not have time for breakfast before going to the Capt. of the Port at 9 to sign up. I went down as 2nd officer.

Found Marian’s age was 59 and Hugo’s 26. Returned to the hotel and drove with Mrs. A. and Mrs. Noble to the Am. Express with the trunk. Shipped my Alaska trunk to Garrison.

Marian, David and I went to lunch with Pres. Quezon in the palace. He was alone and there were no others except his secretary, Mr. Vargas. My card at the table read Prof. Edward Beckwith. Quezon was a very bright looking, dominant character and impressed me as probably being a very good public speaker. He supports the workman and not the aristocrat. At lunch on the piazza of the impressive palace Quezon gave some of his views on European politics. He suggested a fishing trip in his big yacht at one of the islands to the south. So it was arranged that we should go with him starting late Monday and meet the junk at the island. I was rather sorry to see this diversion at the start of the expedition but Mrs. A. accepted the invitation.

After lunch we attended the funeral services of Posidas? the mayor of Manila who has just died. I then drove back to the hotel with Anne in one of the two wheeled carts, which seemed to amuse her greatly. She asked me to come to her room and help check Kilkenny’s account, which I did. I found that the junk had cost $36,000. Kilkenny’s accounts checked within two cents, which was so close that it sounded fishy, but Anne could find no flaw in them. I advised Anne to have the accounts checked by the N.Y. office before paying it.

Kilkenny and Hubrecht and Fant passed me in the lobby on their way to the boat, and I felt sure they were going to celebrate tonight. They asked me to go with them. I told Anne and David at dinner that I thought they were going to celebrate and Anne said if Kilkenny got drunk tonight she would fire him. We will see what happens tomorrow. We went to bed early.

I forgot to record that I went for quite a drive in the afternoon in Mrs. Noble’s car with Anne and Mrs. Noble. We inspected a cathedral and I noticed that Anne put something on her head when she went in, a sort of scarf. She is apparently quite religious. An active day.

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