Fairchild Tropical Garden Expedition aboard the Cheng Ho 1939-1940
NOVEMBER 1939
 
 
 
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DECEMBER 1939
 
 
 
 
 
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JANUARY 1940
 
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FEBRUARY 1940
 
 
 
 
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JAN 1940
27

Tahuna, Sangir Besar, Indonesia

Written by Edward Beckwith on Saturday, January 27, 1940

Outrigger canoes surrounding the Cheng Ho
Outrigger canoes surrounding the Cheng Ho upon its arrival in Tahuna, Sangir Besar, Indonesia. Photographed by David Fairchild.
Edward Beckwith, Anne Archbold, and Marian Fairchild in Tahuna, Sangir Besar
Edward Beckwith, Anne Archbold, and Marian Fairchild in Tahuna, Sangir Besar, Indonesia. Photographed by Fenton Kilkenny.
Anne Archbold, Marian Fairchild, and Fenton Kilkenny in Tahuna, Sangir Besar
Anne Archbold, Marian Fairchild, and Fenton Kilkenny with a group of children in Tahuna, Sangir Besar, Indonesia. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
Slept below until 3 AM very well when Anne looked into my cabin and said that it was much better on deck and almost insisted that I go up there and use her canvas sleeping bag. As I was on watch at 6, I got dressed and went up. There was quite a heavy sea running and things shifted around a good deal. When I went on watch there were 6 small islands in sight and a tide rip plainly visible. There was much rolling. The sea was rougher than it has been at any time although there was little winds. I went to breakfast at 8:30 to find the dining table something of a mess with everything tipped over although the racks were on the table. Anne came on the upper deck and Daan read aloud accounts on the various islands from the pilot book.

Cut all film and filed negatives bringing my own film up to date.

Sea continued rough all day until we entered the harbor at Taroena on the Sangi Islands, anchoring at 4:30 P.M. Town was very small although this island has a population of 80,000. Junk was immediately surrounded by native canoes with outriggers.

Lieutenant de Vries came aboard as officer of the post. This is a closed port and has been so for 3 years mainly to exclude the Japanese. They had received telegrams announcing our coming and without special permission we would not have been admitted.

We went ashore and were greeted by a large crowd of children who followed us down the main street. No roads, no autos, no houses, no electricity and only 7 white families.

There was an auction going on in the residence of the former head here who died in Menado recently. Many beautiful things and Anne and the Fairchilds bought a good many. Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Kiar introduced themselves and asked us to dinner. They were extremely nice and cordial. We dined in their spacious house at about 8:30, a very delicious dinner with a large variety of delicacies on the table. Everyone told David there was probably little here to interest him. After a pleasant evening we returned to the junk.

This was the most primitive and isolated place we have been in.

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