Fairchild Tropical Garden Expedition aboard the Cheng Ho 1939-1940
NOVEMBER 1939
 
 
 
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DECEMBER 1939
 
 
 
 
 
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JANUARY 1940
 
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FEBRUARY 1940
 
 
 
 
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FEB 1940
13

Manado to Bitung, Sulawesi, Indonesia

Written by Edward Beckwith on Tuesday, February 13, 1940

The Cheng Ho anchored at Bitung
The Cheng Ho anchored at Bitung, Sulawesi, Indonesia. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
Bitung harbor
Harbor at Bitung, Sulawesi, Indonesia. Photographed in 2007 by ksoon71
Sulawesi Bear Cuscus
Sulawesi Bear Cuscus (Ailurops ursinus), a marsupial endemic to Sulawesi, Indonesia and surrounding islands. Photographed in 2008 by alanalew
Very heavy rain all last night. This hotel was quiet and an improvement over the other.

Saw new postal of junk which was fair. 100 will be ready later at .20 (Dutch) a piece. Ordered 100 more of junk with native boats.

Drove to native village of Bitung where junk was moored in Tammes’s car with Anne, David, and Hugo. I had to wear a pair of David’s white trousers which were much too large but changed them on the way to shorts.

Found everything all right on the junk and was glad to get back to it. We all had lunch on board. Work of changing the battens to bamboo was underway. David, Tammes, Anne and Daan went out in the launch after lunch for a shore excursion. Daan has shot and skinned a marsupial about the size of a coon.

Took advantage of favorable light and setting to go out in the small launch with Fenton and take some pictures of the junk, also 10 ft of Kodachrome movies. Hugo will mail the roll tomorrow.

It was fine getting back on the junk with the good fellowship of the men and no restrictions after Anne and the Fairchilds had gone back to Manado. In the evening Ted asked me if I would like to go out in the launch, so Daan and I went with him. We had an electric search light and turned it on the shore. Sometimes the eyes of some animal would be reflected back and then disappear in the jungle. This was a great fishing center and large numbers of native boats went out with lights fishing for moderate sized fish which were in great numbers. They returned at daylight. The fish were smoked and shipped. The industry was run by the Japanese.

While we were passing a native thatched house supported on stilts, the native inmates invited us to land and come, which we did. They were smoking fish and about thirty natives gathered around us and served us with mangoes (cut with very dirty knives) and joked in a friendly way. A few could speak a little English. One of the head men, who had been to Mecca, and was treated with respect by the others joined the group. They were all friendly and jolly. We stayed for some time.

No prospect of rain tonight and I felt safe in turning in on deck. Previously we moved the junk further from the settlement to avoid the danger of malaria, which is quite prevalent on this coast.

 

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