Fairchild Tropical Garden Expedition aboard the Cheng Ho 1939-1940
DECEMBER 1939
 
 
 
 
 
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JANUARY 1940
 
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FEBRUARY 1940
 
 
 
 
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MARCH 1940
 
 
 
 
 
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MAR 1940
10

Aboard the Poigar at Tilamuta and Bumbulan, Sulawesi, Indonesia

Written by Edward Beckwith on Sunday, March 10, 1940

Edward Beckwith using the alcohol-fueled cooking pot
Edward Beckwith using the alcohol-fueled cooking pot aboard the Poigar. Photographed by Hugo Curran.
Maleo chick
Maleo (Macrocephalon maleo chick at Tilamuta, Sulawesi. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
Some sleep after twelve o’clock, but the natives became noisy again at daylight. The day was fine and the sea smooth.

Hugo and I made tea on my alcohol stove, and each had a can of fruit.

I found that he or we had forgotten to get bread and salt from the hotel and bananas which we had counted on. I think it had something to do with Miss Tumankol’s visit which put it out of Hugo’s mind, as I rather left it to him because I had got most of the other supplies.

We went ashore at Tilamuta at about 9 and took a drive in a cart. We met Miss Sievy, who runs a coconut plantation near there with her married sister. She had a car and a young Maleo bird in a basket. We drove out to her plantation, which was on the coast, about half an hour away.

I took pictures of the young Maleo bird. Miss Sievy was partly Malay, partly Arab, partly Dutch and distinctly native looking. I went to the Dutch bath room and took advantage of the opportunity to take a complete bath. We walked down the beach to some Maleo nests in the sand and I took pictures of one of her young birds in one of the holes. She was pleasant but her English was almost un-understandable. She returned with us to the town where we said good bye, and she presented me with a snapshot of herself.

The boat started at about 11:30. I found a place at the stern where I could place a mattress and get some sleep. There was smell and a great deal of vibration but I slept just the same. Hugo slept too, in the sun on the forward part of the deck, and got considerably burned. At about 3 we had a mixture of canned tomato and vegetable soup and I had a can of fruit, while he had peanut butter with nothing to put it on.

We anchored at Bumbulan, still on the same coast, at about 2:30.

We were still east of Marissa and the coast is the same as we followed on the Cheng Ho, so that everything had a familiar look. When the “Poigar” strikes south to Unauna we will then see a new and interesting island.

 

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