Fairchild Tropical Garden Expedition aboard the Cheng Ho 1939-1940
DECEMBER 1939
 
 
 
 
 
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JANUARY 1940
 
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FEBRUARY 1940
 
 
 
 
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MARCH 1940
 
 
 
 
 
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MAR 1940
13

Poso, Sulawesi, Indonesia

Written by Edward Beckwith on Wednesday, March 13, 1940

The Te Velde family, Poso
The Te Velde family, Dutch Resident Agent at Poso, Sulawesi, Indonesia. Photographed by Edward Beckwith
A fine clear morning. My recording thermometer registered since Gorontalo a maximum of 94 degrees Fahrenreit which was reached on the Poigar.

The question is before us as to whether the trip to Macassar is possible overland at this season. We had heard that fording rivers with horses might not be possible on account of rains. Information was contradictory and unreliable. We went with Mr. Te Velde to see a missionary, Mr. Herring, who had been through this country in mind. He thought there would be no great difficulty and went over the route with us on a map. He said the worst rains came in April and we might find it wet as our proposed date is toward the end of March. Places and distances were as follows, — Pindolo to Mayoa (horse) 10k; Mayoa to Tedantana (horse) 20k (spend night); Tedantana to Tawibaru (horse) 16k; Tawibaru to Mangkutana (horse) 10k; Mangkutana to Palopo (car).

This was the only part of the trip which was uncertain and required horses. We concluded we would need 6 horses. At 3 P.M. Mr. Te Velde and his family of wife and 5 children, also Mr. De Grijp joined us and we went out on a launch which we had chartered, first east along the coast and then up the river. Mrs. Te Velde brought cold tea and various kinds of cakes. The river was bordered with very beautiful Sago palms. The boat was moored about 5k up the river and all but Mrs. Te Velde, I, and the two younger children went on a 4k hike to an ebony plantation. I stayed and talked with Mrs. Te Velde.

In returning to the inn in the dark I slipped into a concrete ditch and skinned my shin, which was bothersome and rather painful. Hugo found that he had brought no iodine so put some Peruvian balsam on it.

At Mr Te Velde’s I tried 3 fruits I had not sampled before, Chico, Pomolo, and Durian. The Chico was rather tasteless, the Pomolo was good, and the Durian possibly an acquired taste.

Hugo and Mr. De Grijp went to the Assistant Residents in the evening to get radio news about peace between Russia and Finland.

 

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