Fairchild Tropical Garden Expedition aboard the Cheng Ho 1939-1940
JANUARY 1940
 
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FEBRUARY 1940
 
 
 
 
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MARCH 1940
 
 
 
 
 
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APRIL 1940
 
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APR 1940
3

Kulawi to Gimpu, Sulawesi, Indonesia

Written by Edward Beckwith on Wednesday, April 3, 1940

We started in the car at 7:30 to spend the day at Gimpu, which is the end of the road – from there nothing but trails into the forest. Arrived in two hours over a rough winding road – distance 27 km. On the way Hugo found a banana tree that was new to him and which bore a very large bunch of bananas. He obtained a sucker and I photographed the bunch on the tree.

Gimpu consisted of two small collections of native houses and a palm thatched pasang grahan, where we stopped before going further. This small inn consisted of three rooms and a porch with some rattan chairs. The rooms were bare and anyone coming here must bring their own bedding and food. There was no one in attendance and no charge was made for the use of the rooms. These small rest houses are maintained by the Dutch government primarily for the use of officials, but anyone can use them when not occupied by them.

Gimpu was at the entrance to the Bada country, the town Gintu being 53 km distant. I was sorry not to be going on by horseback to this interesting place where the Torana Mahile lived: yet it was something to have got us as far as this.

Hugo started on a hike while I went to the river about a mile distant and tried to wade across it with the idea of following the Gintu trail a short distance. Three quarters of the way across the current became very swift and I turned back so as not to risk wetting the cameras.

I passed some natives on the trail, women and children. They had the most scared and primitive look of any I have seen.

Hugo returned at about 4, very much sunburned and with some very large pinkish flowers which were such fine subjects for color that I took 11 color views of them besides the usual black and white. He said the variety was zingerberaceous and he was much pleased with the find.

We started on the return trip at 4:50 and by fast driving over the rough road were back in 1 hr 20 mins. The jungle through which we went was the most lofty and wild looking of any I have been through.

Mr. Esser came in the evening. He wore a coat and said that he had a fever.

Banana plant beside the road from Kulawi to Gimpu

Banana plant beside the road from Kulawi to Gimpu, Sulawesi, Indonesia. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
The small, thatched inn at Gimpu

The small, thatched pasang grande (inn) at Gimpu. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
Leaves and fruit of Pongamia tree collected near Gimpu

Leaves and fruit of Pongamia tree collected near Gimpu. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
Hugo Curran holding flowering stalks of an Etlingera

Hugo Curran holding flowering stalks of an Etlingera, the “zingiberaceous plant” described in Beckwith’s diary. Photographed by Edward Beckwith
A specimen of Eugenia curranii

A specimen of Eugenia curranii. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
A specimen of Syzgium

A specimen of Syzgium. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.

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