Fairchild Tropical Garden Expedition aboard the Cheng Ho 1939-1940
MARCH 1940
 
 
 
 
 
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APRIL 1940
 
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MAY 1940
 
 
 
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JUNE 1940
 
 
 
 
 
 
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JUN 1940
4

South Loloda Bay, Halmahera, Indonesia

Written by Edward Beckwith on Tuesday, June 4, 1940

Anne, David, Hugo and I started early in the large launch to explore the Labo River. We were at first not able to find its mouth and Anne got very angry with David because he had not found out yesterday where the river was. She went to the forward seat of the boat and would not speak to anyone.

We finally went to the village and got a native to come along to show us where it was. We followed it up the river for some distance. It was longer than the Loloda River but of much the same character. David did not find much of interest. When we were well up the river Hugo remarked several times that we had better start back while the tide was high. This was to avoid running aground with the large launch. Anne thought there was no hurry.

When we started back the river was so low that there was great difficulty in getting the launch over shoals. We all got out into the water twice, that is all except Anne. Finally a log barred the way and we could not get by it. Anne and David went back on a prau, while Hugo, I, and Ah Gun stayed with the launch expecting to wait several hours for the next tide. We got stuck at 11 A.M. There was heavy rain but Hugo went for a hike while I took a nap under the canvas top in the boat.

The river began to rise again at 12:30. While sitting in the launch Hugo saw a large lizard in a tree on the end of a limb. He climbed the tree and shook the branch. The lizard jumped in the river and swam away.

At 2:30 we heard the small launch coming and Fenton appeared with Ah Fook and a lot of food. We had lunch and by three the river was high enough to get the large launch over the log and we returned to the boat.

I noticed more than usually today the somewhat strained relations between Anne and David, which have been evident for perhaps a week. David does not talk much to Anne at the table and has chosen to sit recently at the opposite end from her. Both David and Hugo were much disgusted with her for throwing overboard a large bunch of wild bananas from which they had not yet extracted the seeds. Marian told me she was afraid to leave her collected shells on deck for fear Anne might not like the smell, which certainly is unpleasant, and throw them over board.

Hugo was anxious to sail next to the other side of Halmahera peninsula and about 80 miles, where we would be on a shore which was within six miles of the erupting volcano. Ted and I found that there was a Dutch official at the town there so nothing more was said about it. After talking with David I think the plan will be to make for Zamboanga in the Philippines by the shortest way.

Shoreline of South Loloda Bay
Shoreline of South Loloda Bay. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
Mouth of the Labo River, Halmahera
Mouth of the Labo River, Halmahera. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
Labo River, Halmahera
Labo River, Halmahera. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
 
Prau and sago palms (Metroxylon sagu) on the Labo River
Prau and sago palms (Metroxylon sagu) on the Labo River. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
Shoreline of Labo River, Halmahera
Shoreline of Labo River, Halmahera. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
Hugo Curran and Ann Archbold after the launch ran aground on the Labo River
Hugo Curran and Ann Archbold after the launch ran aground on the Labo River. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
 

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