Fairchild Tropical Garden Expedition aboard the Cheng Ho 1939-1940
MARCH 1940
 
 
 
 
 
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APRIL 1940
 
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MAY 1940
 
 
 
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JUNE 1940
 
 
 
 
 
 
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JUN 1940
11

Arangkaa, Talaud Islands, Indonesia

Written by Edward Beckwith on Tuesday, June 11, 1940

There was a great deal of motion in the night and my cot swayed and creaked so that I had to discard it and sleep on a mattress on deck. It rained and the mattress got wet. Ah Fook came round and helped me get below. There was a very heavy sea and so much rolling that I could not sleep on account of things banging around. Anne’s collection of large shells crashed across the deck breaking some. Anne herself slipped in the wet and hurt herself, but not seriously. I thought that there was a feeling of hope in certain quarters that she was sufficiently injured to be suppressed, as she orders everyone about so that there would be a decided feeling of relief if this could be stopped.

We turned due West in the morning when our dead reckoning showed that we were well up the coast of the largest island. Ted went below to sleep and left me to keep watch. I did not sight land for some time. Finally several islands appeared which I found it hard to identify. None of the bearings seemed to place us in a correct position. I finally called Ted at 10:30 and we concluded we were north of the Talaud Islands and approaching another group of small islands named the Nanoesa Islands. My latitude sight at noon definitely confirmed this and proved that we had been carried by currents far north and east of our DR positions. We would have liked to anchor but the data on the chart was too fragmentary and we sailed south west for a small bay on the northern end of the largest Talaud Island, known as Arangkaa Anchorage. The wind increased and the sea was much more rough than at any time. We finally anchored in the small quiet bay at 5:45. A heavy rain came up just afterwards.

I had not had my clothes off or shaved since yesterday A.M. and was glad to drop anchor in a quaint harbor.

The log showed just 200 miles and Ted figured that we had been carried by the current 55 miles in a northeasterly direction. The whole trip was a valuable navigating experience and I am beginning to feel self confident in handling the difficult courses in these waters.

News from Europe has been very depressing. Norway surrendered to the Germans, who had come within 40 miles of Paris. Italy has entered the war on the side of Germany.

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