Fairchild Tropical Garden Expedition aboard the Cheng Ho 1939-1940
MARCH 1940
 
 
 
 
 
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APRIL 1940
 
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MAY 1940
 
 
 
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JUNE 1940
 
 
 
 
 
 
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JUN 1940
24

Zamboanga, Mindanao, Philippines

Written by Edward Beckwith on Monday, June 24, 1940

Zamboanga shoreline
Zamboanga shoreline. Photographed in 2008 by lutykuh, jr.
After a sound sleep I prepared to leave and move on board with the remainder of our supplies. There was a good deal to do cleaning up and putting everything in shape. At about 10:30 I telephoned Mrs. Wilson, after failing to get a taxi, the telephone being at the country club a short distance away.

She sent her car out for me and I drove in, stopping at her Zamboanga house to leave the key. I learned later that David drove out to pay me a visit after I had gone.

The Cheng Ho was at the pier taking on fuel. Anne was on board and told me we would leave for Cebu tomorrow, that she was in no hurry to get back and would remain until Sept. She also repeated that the air rates and steamer rates were the same, a statement which I am sure is a mistake. Anne seemed disturbed and she is certainly on bad terms with every member of the party. She made some comment about me staying at Mrs. Wilsons so long. I heard later from Ted that she had been counting on me to do some packing for her. I imagine that both Hugo and Fenton would refuse to help her. She left soon with Mrs. Wilson and did not return.

The Fairchilds have not secured their reservation yet and I have made no attempt to get mine. It is usually possible for a single man to get in at the last minute.

Ted proposed sailing the boat to Honolulu or across the ocean and said he would be willing to do it if I would go. I think Ted wants to go to New York and he thinks that Anne could agree to such a plan if I would go. Of course such suggestions are made on condition that Anne would not go herself.

We heard through an army officer that two steamers went by with 1500 Japanese women and children from Davao on the way to Japan. The explanation of this was not entirely clear but did not sound well for Japanese and U.S. relations.

Everyone went to the movie “Gullivers Travels.” I did not go even under Marian’s urging but read and turned in early on deck. We had previously moved from the dock to our former anchorage.

 

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