Fairchild Tropical Garden Expedition aboard the Cheng Ho 1939-1940
MARCH 1940
 
 
 
 
 
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
APRIL 1940
 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
MAY 1940
 
 
 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
JUNE 1940
 
 
 
 
 
 
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
JUN 1940
25

Zamboanga, Mindanao, Philippines

Written by Edward Beckwith on Tuesday, June 25, 1940

The Gospel Ship, a missionary vessel anchored at Zamboanga, Mindanao, Philippines
The “Gospel Ship,” a missionary vessel anchored at Zamboanga, Mindanao, Philippines. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
 
Considerable rain during the night made everyone leave the deck except me. I was perfectly comfortable in a canvas bag and the small amount of rain which came under the covering did not matter.

A 120 ft. 300 HP diesel yacht has been anchored near us for several days. On the stern is “Gospel Ship” Boston. The captain is a missionary named Schofield and his trip is financed by a Mrs. Peabody of Boston. He has made a proposition to Anne about putting up his boat here and sailing the junk to America. Anne came aboard with him and a Capt. Gilroy at about 11 and announced that they had come to an agreement. The plan was that after the junk had been conditioned at Cebu, he would sail her to Tahiti. Anne would return from Cebu to the U.S. by Clipper and meet the junk in Tahiti in the autumn with a party for a cruise among the South Pacific Islands.

The missionary was a thick set, hardy looking man, and according to Ted used very bad language. He looked the boat over and examined the equipment. The first question was whether the present Chinese crew would go along. He interviewed Ah Gun who said he would talk it over with the others and give an answer in an hour. This was that they would return to Hong Kong. He asked me to come along as 1st mate. I refused. Neither Kilkenney or Fenton will go. The course he proposed to take was along the New Guinea coast and south, then north with the trade winds, a distance of about 6000 miles. The junk was is not well suited to bucking the strong eastern trade wind and I would not care to try this trip under the best conditions.

Anne told me the plan and asked me what I was going to do. I told her I would go to Cebu.

The Fairchilds decided to leave the boat and go to a hotel until they could get a steamer to Manila. Incidentally, they have not yet secured reservations for the U.S. Before leaving, David had a confidential talk with me about Anne, which was not at all complimentary to her. They both looked glad to get off the boat.

Is is unfortunate that this cruise, on which so much has been accomplished, should end with ill-feeling, because the trip has on the whole been enjoyable and successful. No one on board has ended with friendly feelings for Anne.

According to the arrangement with Schofield he was to take his boat to an anchorage about 7 miles up the coast and we were to follow with the Cheng Ho. A very heavy rain squall came up and interfered with this plan.

Anne went ashore this AM and has gone to the Worcesters, so that the only ones left on board are Ted, Fenton, Hugo, I and the Chinese crew.

I felt decidedly relieved to have everything definitely settled, yet there still remains the trip to Cebu with Anne and the missionary on board, then the run to Manila by steamer, possibly with Anne, and afterward the problem of getting reservations to the U.S.

Ted, Fenton, Hugo and I had dinner alone, and there was a good deal of talk about Anne and the trip. Schofield did not make a good impression, and no one knows much about him. I can only foresee difficulty from this arrangement.

Submit a comment

You can use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>