Fairchild Tropical Garden Expedition aboard the Cheng Ho 1939-1940
MARCH 1940
 
 
 
 
 
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APRIL 1940
 
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MAY 1940
 
 
 
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JUNE 1940
 
 
 
 
 
 
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JUN 1940
26

Zamboanga to Caldera Bay, Mindanao, Philippines

Written by Edward Beckwith on Wednesday, June 26, 1940

After breakfast we raised anchor and sailed 7 miles west to another anchorage. The “Gospel Ship” had moved there already and we anchored near her opposite the native village of Recodo and Worcester’s coconut shredding plant off Caldera Point. Passing the Worcesters’ house, they and Anne waved to us.

Anne came aboard later with Schofield and I heard more of her plans. She told me she would stay in Cebu only long enough to settle up everything, then go to Manila and take the Clipper to the U.S. She would then return to Tahiti in two months with a new party and meet the junk to make a trip among the South Pacific Islands and return in the junk to the U.S. by way of the Panama Canal. She asked me to be one of the party. The others she had in mind were Mrs. Harrison with her sound recorder and a shell expert. I told her that it was too soon to decide. She also wanted to make a reservation on the plane for me, but I said I would wait to decide between a boat and a plane until reaching Manila.

Gilroy came aboard. He is captain of a steamer “the Mayan” but had his license suspended for a year because he ran on a reef. We measured the distance to Tahiti and found it 5300 miles in a direct line and about 9000 miles sailing distance due to the eastern trades.

Schofield asked me about Mrs. Archbold but I was noncommital. She, he and I went out to his boat and she asked to see his papers and credentials. I understand she has already signed a contract with him. According to Ted he is to receive 400.- a month and expenses. In addition to this he gets 350.- a month as a missionary and his wife gets 150.- a month. His boat, 29 ft. beam and 120 ft. over all, had a great deal of room below decks and was fitted with a 120 HP, 2 cycle diesel. His wife and little girl were aboard the former a very large woman who will return to the U.S. with the child next month. Ted told me that when she passed the image of Tin Fe in the dining room she covered it with her hat. This showed how the missionary mind works. I must tell Anne about it.

Anne left and Marian and David came aboard in the afternoon. They seemed cheerful and glad to have left the boat for good. They asked me to come to dinner at the hotel this evening.

I made two series of photographs which I was glad to complete without interference, — two pictures of each member of the Chinese crew and a very complete set of interior flash lights.

I drove to Zamboanga with Ted. He, Fenton and Hugo and I dined with the Fairchilds. The whole conversation was one of criticism and condemnation of Anne; David and Marian felt more resentful towards her than I had thought possible and Ted, who had a little to drink for the first time in weeks, threatened serious trouble if she did not pay him what he considered his due before they part in Cebu. They all recognized that I was the only one who has kept friends with her. I became rather tired of the conversation before dinner was over. Ted said that he can have an order placed on the boat in Cebu so it cannot be moved until he is paid. Ted can be extremely ugly and I can see a difficult situation there with the resentment he has felt on the whole trip coming out.

We returned at about 10 and went through the coconut shredding plant on the way. They were running a night shift.

I received two letters from MPB by way of Ambon. They were written in April and had both come by way of Singapore, where they had been opened and censored. No news of importance.

Kai, a member of the Cheng Ho crew
Kai, a member of the Cheng Ho crew. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
Sam, cabin boy aboard the Cheng Ho
Sam, cabin boy aboard the Cheng Ho. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
Han, a member of the Cheng Ho crew
Han, a member of the Cheng Ho crew. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
 
Ah Gunn, boatswain aboard the Cheng Ho
Ah Gunn, boatswain aboard the Cheng Ho. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
Fan Tai Sing, a member of the Cheng Ho crew
Fan Tai Sing, a member of the Cheng Ho crew. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
Ah Fook, a member of the Cheng Ho crew
Ah Fook, a member of the Cheng Ho crew. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
 
Fo Tai, a member of the Cheng Ho crew
Fo Tai, a member of the Cheng Ho crew. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
Ho Su, cook aboard the Cheng Ho
Ho Su, cook aboard the Cheng Ho. Photographed by Edward Beckwith.
 

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